Thank You for Celebrating Translations with Us!

The 8th edition of National Translation Month was a tremendous success! We’re very grateful to all the authors, translators, and event organizers who celebrated with us, and to our 6,000+ followers on social media whom we sought to inspire and engage.

We close National Translation Month 2020 on a high note: September 30 is celebrated worldwide as International Translation Day. We’re leaving you with seven poems by the Costa Rican-born poet, Anabelle Aguilar Brealey, translated from Spanish by Diana Manole.

Stay tuned for translation news, collaborations, and publishing opportunities we’ll continue to post throughout the year. Join our mailing list, follow us on Twitter, or like us on Facebook. And, if you like what we’re doing, support our efforts with a small donation here. It will help us bring more literary translations to an even wider audience next year.

We hope you’ll continue to celebrate translations throughout the year. If you think of a way you’d like to celebrate NTM in 2021, drop us a line at nationaltranslationmonth@gmail.com and we’ll be happy to include it in our next year calendar. The world lies open—take time to explore it. And celebrate the craft of translation in September and beyond.

Click here to read Consumed by Fire: Poems by Anabelle Aguilar Brealey Translated from Spanish by Diana Manole

—Claudia Serea & Loren Kleinman

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Consumed by Fire: Poems by Anabelle Aguilar Brealey Translated from Spanish by Diana Manole

As part of our commitment to featuring the work of women writers and translators, we’re excited to share today seven poems by the Costa Rican-born poet, Anabelle Aguilar Brealey, translated from Spanish by Diana Manole. These beautiful poems are part of Aguilar Brealey’s anthology “She-Wolf Trail” that includes selections from nine poetry books. The poems, originally published in Consumidas por fuego (Consumed by Fire, Uruk Editores, San José, 2011), take the reader on a virtual gallery tour, investigating the life and work of painters, sculptors, and photographers, blending gracious images, and passionately advocating for women’s rights. They are accompanied by an insightful translator note that documents Diana Manole’s process, illuminating her word choices and offering the back story behind these translations.

We’d love to hear from you! Follow us on Twitter @TranslateMonth, tag us @TranslateMonth and share using #TranslationMonth, join our mailing list, submit a translation month event, or like our Facebook page. We hope you’ll join us and celebrate your favorite translations of women writers
from all over the world in September and beyond.

Click here to read Consumed by Fire: Poems by Anabelle Aguilar Brealey Translated from Spanish by Diana Manole

—Claudia Serea and Loren Kleinman

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Inside a Horizon of Hills: New Prose by Franca Mancinelli Translated from the Italian by John Taylor

We’re excited to share with you today an excerpt from the autobiographical writings of the award-winning poet and writer, Franca Mancinelli, translated from the Italian by John Taylor. Inside the Horizon of Hills evokes her hometown of Fano, on the Adriatic coast, where she was born in 1981, and its immediate hinterland.

Her poetic prose will transport you into the world of her childhood behind the sea of hills that hide family secrets: “It is precisely here that the madness begins, all the deeper and more radical as the distance from the sea increases.” Tell us what you think using @TranslateMonth and #TranslationMonth!

Click here to read Inside a Horizon of Hills by Franca Mancinelli
Translated from the Italian by John Taylor


—Claudia Serea and Loren Kleinman

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What Clumsiness of Heart, This Night: New Translations of Romanian Poetry

Today, we’re excited to share a selection of new translations of Romanian poetry: an excerpt from The God’s Orbit by Aura Christi translated by Adam J. Sorkin and Petru Iamandi, as well as several poems by Traian T. Coșovei translated by Adam J. Sorkin and Andreea Iulia Scridon. These poems have in common the searing language with which they confront either the divinity in the case of Christi’s poems, or the human existence in Coșovei’s unforgettable verse.

Let us know what you think! Follow us on Twitter @TranslateMonth, tag us @TranslateMonth and share using #TranslationMonth, join our mailing list, submit a translation month event, or like our Facebook page. We hope you’ll join us and celebrate your favorite translations of poets from all over the world throughout September.

Click here to read What Clumsiness of Heart, This Night:
New Translations of Romanian Poetry


—Claudia Serea and Loren Kleinman

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Famine Is a Conquering Quake: New Hausa Poetry Translated by Sada Malumfashi

We’re happy to feature again this year new translations from the Hausa language: four poems by Ibrahim Malumfashi translated by Sada Malumfashi. Accompanying the poems, several evocative portraits and photos depicting the Nigerian way of life give the reader a more immersive experience.

Hausa is a Chadic language with about 39 million speakers. It is spoken mainly in northern Nigeria and Niger, and also in Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Eritrea, Gabon, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Sudan, and Togo.

We’d love to hear what you think! National Translation Month is a community of 6,000+ fans across all social media, and growing. Find us on Twitter @TranslateMonth, tag us using #TranslationMonth, join our mailing list, submit a translation month event, or like our Facebook page. And celebrate your favorite writers in translation from all over the world in September and beyond.

Click here to read Famine Is a Conquering Quake:
Poems by Ibrahim Malumfashi translated by Sada Malumfashi


—Claudia Serea and Loren Kleinman

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When Kisses Were Breakfast and Dinner: Poems by Vasyl Makhno Translated from Ukrainian by Olena Jennings

Today, National Translation Month continues with new translations from the Ukrainian. We’re delighted to share four poems by the acclaimed poet Vasyl Makhno translated by the accomplished translator and poet, Olena Jennings. These beautiful poems will take you on a lyrical trip from New York to California, a reminder of life before Covid-19 “when kisses were breakfast and dinner.” We hope you’ll like them as much as we do.

We’d love to hear from you! Follow us on Twitter @TranslateMonth, tag us @TranslateMonth and share using #TranslationMonth, join our mailing list, submit a translation month event, or like our Facebook page. We hope you’ll join us and celebrate your favorite translations of writers
from all over the world in September and beyond.

Click here to read When Kisses Were Breakfast and Dinner:
Poems by Vasyl Makhno Translated from Ukrainian by Olena Jennings


—Claudia Serea and Loren Kleinman

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NTM Premiere: Are There Copper Pipes in Heaven—New Poems by Katrin Ottarsdóttir Translated from the Faroese by Matthew Landrum

Continuing our tradition of publishing women in translation, we’re excited to present a selection of new Faroese poetry translated by the accomplished poet and translator Matthew Landrum with Sámal Soll. Acclaimed Faroese filmmaker Katrin Ottarsdóttir’s first collection, Are there Copper Pipes in Heaven (Operating System/Unsilenced Texts, 2020) is a family portrait of abuse, addiction, and mental illness. This autobiographical work is the first book of confessional poetry in Faroese literature. It is the first complete book of poetry translated from Faroese and published in English—and we’re happy to feature Ottarsdóttir’s poignant poetry in premiere at NTM.

We’d love to hear from you! Let us know how you like our picks and what other works you’d like to see us publish. Follow us on Twitter @TranslateMonth, tag us @TranslateMonth and share using #TranslationMonth, join our mailing list, submit a translation month event, or like our Facebook page.

Click here to read Are there Copper Pipes in Heaven
New Poems by Katrin Ottarsdóttir Translated from the Faroese by Matthew Landrum


—Claudia Serea and Loren Kleinman

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Talassus | Voyeur Music Album & Translations from Arabic by Bahloul (Hussam Jefee-Bahloul)

Today, we’re excited to share an interesting project that combines music with poetry: selections of lyrics from the debut album Talassus | Voyeur by poet and performer Bahloul (Hussam Jefee-Bahloul),translated from the Arabic by the author. We are also including a recording of the Talassus (Master Voyeur) song to sample the flavors of the music. You can listen to Talassus | Voyeur (تلصُّص) online on: Spotify, Youtube Music, SoundCloud, or Apple Music, and read the stories behind each song at www.thebahloul.com.

We’d love to hear what you think! Find us on twitter @TranslateMonth, share using #TranslationMonth, join our mailing list, submit a translation month event, or like our Facebook page. We hope you’ll join us and celebrate your favorite translations throughout September.

Click here to listen to Talassus (Master Voyeur)
Click here to read the poems

—Claudia Serea and Loren Kleinman

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From the Fairy Tale “Die”: Poems by Gena Gruz Translated from the Russian by Aaron Poochigian

National Translation Month continues today with some dazzling new translations of contemporary Russian poetry. We’re thrilled to share a selection of poems by Gena Gruz translated by Aaron Poochigian. These short stanzas will take you on a surreal journey away from barking feral dreams to dusty slums where charred flowers open, to urban abandoned gardens where the Minotaur awaits. They will surprise and delight you, hopefully becoming your new favorites.

We’d love to hear from you! Follow us on Twitter @TranslateMonth, share using #TranslationMonth, join our mailing list, submit a translation month event, or like our Facebook page. Celebrate with us your favorite translations of poetry and women poets from all over the world in September and beyond.

Click here to read From the Fairy Tale “Die”: Poems by Gena Gruz
Translated from the Russian by Aaron Poochigian


—Claudia Serea and Loren Kleinman

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Butterflies sip turtles’ tears: New Poems by Carmen Firan Translated from the Romanian by Alexandra Carides

National Translation Month continues its established tradition of publishing women translating women poets with a new selection of poems by the accomplished Romanian writer, editor, and poet, Carmen Firan, translated by Alexandra Carides.

Let us know what you think! Follow us on Twitter @TranslateMonth, tag us @TranslateMonth and share using #TranslationMonth, join our mailing list, submit a translation month event, or like our Facebook page. We hope you’ll join us and celebrate your favorite translations of poets from all over the world throughout September.

Click here to read Butterflies sip turtles’ tears: New Poems by Carmen Firan
Translated from the Romanian by Alexandra Carides


—Claudia Serea and Loren Kleinman

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